1. Side Panel Savvy- INGREDIENTS
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    All ingredients used in the product are listed here in descending order of amount contained in the product. The first ingredient listed comprises most of the product, and the last ingredient listed comprises the least proportional amount of the product.
  2. Side Panel Savvy: SERVING SIZE
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section. requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. Below, we have listed the definitions (as defined by the FDA) for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel.

    Serving sizes may vary from product to product, but are presented in familiar units such as cups or pieces. The amount is based upon the amount of food people typically eat, and the nutritional information given on the side panel pertains to this listed serving size.
  3. Side Panel Savvy: CALORIES
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Calories measure how much energy is provided from a serving of the product. Calories are figured from the amount of carbohydrates, fat, and protein found in the product.
    • Carbohydrates = 4 cal/gram
    • Fat = 9 cal/gram
    • Protein = 4 cal/gram
  4. Side Panel Savvy: CALORIES FROM FAT
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    This number shows, of the total calories found per serving, how much of those calories come from fat.
  5. Side Panel Savvy: % DAILY VALUE
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    The percentages in this column are figured based upon the 2,000-calorie daily diet composition footnote at the bottom of the nutritional panel. This shows what percent of the daily value is found in each serving of the product.
  6. Side Panel Savvy: TOTAL FAT
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Total fat consists of three types of fat – saturated (the bad kind!), monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated (good kinds!)
  7. Side Panel Savvy: SATURATED FAT
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    This is the “bad” kind of fat, and its amount should be monitored carefully as part of your overall diet.
  8. Side Panel Savvy: CHOLESTEROL
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    If a product contains less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol per serving, the FDA allows this percentage to be rounded down to zero. (Cholesterol is found in products with animal origins.)
  9. Side Panel Savvy: SODIUM
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    The amount of sodium intake, found in salt, should be monitored carefully as part of your overall diet. “Low Sodium” products contain 140 milligrams or less of sodium per serving.
  10. Side Panel Savvy: TOTAL CARBOHYDRATES
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Carbohydrates, or “carbs”, have three categories – simple (sugars), complex (starches), and dietary fiber.
  11. Side Panel Savvy: DIETARY FIBER
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Dietary fiber is a type of carbohydrate that is found in products and ingredients of plant origin. This is commonly referred to as “roughage” and is part of a healthy diet.
  12. Side Panel Savvy: SUGARS
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Sugars can either be naturally occurring (such as fructose contained in fruit and milk) or from refined sources (such as table sugar, or corn syrup). Both kinds are included in the nutrition panel. The ingredient list should give specifics on naturally occurring or added sugars. There is no set daily value of sugar determined by the FDA.
  13. Side Panel Savvy: PROTEIN
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    Protein can be derived from products of both animal and plant origin. Protein provides energy and helps build our bodies. There is no set daily value of protein determined by the FDA.
  14. Side Panel Savvy: VITAMINS & MINERALS
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    These numbers list what percentage of the daily referenced value (2,000 calories) is fulfilled by one serving of the product.
  15. Side Panel Savvy: STANDARD FOOTNOTE
    Become a label reader! The FDA requires certain nutritional information to be listed on all food products. We have listed (as defined by the FDA) the definitions for each piece of a Nutrition Facts side panel as part of our Side Panel Savvy FAQ section.

    For labeling purposes, the FDA set a 2,000-calorie daily diet as the reference amount for calculating % daily values. This footnote provides general dietary guidelines for what a “typical” person’s nutritional intake should be. This information does not represent what is in a particular product. This information does not change from label to label – it is used to calculate the product’s contribution towards the daily referenced value.
  16. Learn about: FAT FREE
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about... 

    In order to be considered "Fat Free", a product must contain less than 1/2 gram of fat per serving. If a product contains less than 1/2 gram of fat per serving, its value is rounded down to zero when listed on a "Nutrition Facts" side panel.
  17. Learn about: FLAXSEED
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    Flaxseed, a major ingredient found in Uncle Sam Cereal holds great nutritional benefits – the high content of Omega-3 being one of flaxseed’s most positive attributes.

    Although about 42% of flaxseed is oil, very little of that fat is saturated (the bad kind!) Most of it is of the healthful polyunsaturated type. In fact, a unique feature of flaxseed is the high ratio of linolenic (omega-3) to linoleic (omega-6) fatty acids. Nutritionists consider these two polyunsaturated fats as essential because the body cannot manufacture them from any other substances. Therefore, they must be eaten as part of the diet. While other plant seed contain omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, flaxseed is the only grain that contains so much of the essential omega-3 fats. Omega-3 fatty acids participate in immune processes, help form cell membranes, and play a role in the production of hormone-like compounds.

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been studied extensively for their potential health benefits in lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels, angina, and other risk factors for stroke and heart attack. Some research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may be helpful in lessening the symptoms of arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and may help alleviate some skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema.

    Flaxseed is also rich in both soluble and insoluble fiber, and contains high levels of plant lignans. Lignans are highly researched plant chemicals that have been found to have anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. The greatest and most promising attribute of lignans is the possible prevention of cancerous cells formation. The shell hull of the flaxseed has a higher concentration of lignans than any other food.
  18. Learn about: GOOD SOURCE OF FIBER
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    “Good Source” means that the product has at least 10% of the daily referenced value (2,000-calorie daily diet) as established by the FDA. Pertaining to fiber, products that contain between 3-4 grams of fiber per serving are designated as a “Good Source of Fiber”.
  19. Learn about: HEART HEALTHY
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    The FDA confirms that soluble fiber from oats as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. Products designated as “Heart Healthy” have these characteristics.

    To learn more about Heart Health, visit the American Heart Association website.
  20. Learn about: HIGH FIBER
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    “High” means that the product has at least 20% of the daily referenced value (2,000-calorie daily diet) as established by the FDA. In relation to fiber, products that contain at least 5 grams of fiber per serving are designated as “High Fiber”.
  21. Learn about: KOSHER
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    All Attune Foods products are certified Kosher by either Organized Kashrus Laboratories or Orthodox Union.
  22. Learn about: LOW FAT
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    "Low Fat" products contain less than 3 grams of fat per serving (and more than 1/2 gram of fat per serving).
  23. Learn about: LOW SODIUM
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    “Low Sodium” products contain 140 milligrams or less of sodium per serving.
  24. Learn about: NATURAL
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    "Natural" describes products that have undergone minimal processing and contain no preservatives or artificial additives.
  25. Learn about: ORGANIC
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    Organically grown food has been grown and processed without using synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the following guidelines must be met when labeling a product “organic”:
    • Products labeled “100% Organic” must contain only organically produced ingredients (excluding water and salt).
    • Products labeled “Organic” must consist of at least 95% organically produced ingredients (excluding water and salt). Also, any remaining product ingredients must consist of approved nonagricultural ingredients or non-organic ingredients that are not available in a commercially viable organic form
    • Products that contain at least 70% organic ingredients may be labeled “Made with organic ingredients”.
  26. Learn about: WHOLE GRAINS
    Understanding common terms used throughout the natural foods industry is key in helping you make sound dietary decisions. These standards have been defined by the FDA and organic regulatory bodies and posted in the Nutritional Know-Hows FAQ section. Let's learn about...

    There are three parts to a whole grain:
    • Germ (the inner layer) – contains B vitamins that play a key role in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, fats and energy.
    • Endosperm (the middle layer) – provides a source of energy for body cells.
    • Bran (the outer layer) – is an excellent source of fiber.
       
    Thus, whole grain cereals are an excellent and easy way to get many of the necessary nutrients important to a healthy diet. Rich in complex carbohydrates that provide a source of energy and dietary fiber, whole grains also contain nutrients such as vitamin E and selenium, which may protect against heart disease and cancer.

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About Us

At Attune Foods, we believe what matters most is what's inside. We make our foods from simple ingredients, simply made like Uncle Sam cereal, Erewhon organic cereals and grahams or our attune probiotic chocolate bars. Attune Foods commits to bringing you food that helps you feel good and that you can feel good about eating with your family.