1. How do I know if a food is gluten free?
    If you discover that you may have an allergy to gluten, it's important to know how to eat gluten free. As a result of Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA), food manufacturers must label food products that contain an ingredient that is or contains protein from a major food allergen (milk, egg, soy, peanut/tree-nut, fish/shellfish, and WHEAT) in one of two ways: include the name in parentheses or place the word “Contains” followed by the name of the food source from which the allergen was derived. This does not include rye or barley, however. These labeling requirements make it easier for consumers to understand how to eat gluten free and make smart choices when it comes to celiac disease foods.

    Product ingredient labels should be carefully scrutinized to determine the ingredients are in fact gluten free and can be considered celiac disease foods. Currently, there is NO regulation declaring food companies have to put the words “Gluten Free” on the product.

     
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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on how to eat gluten free by choosing foods that are safe for celiac disease. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  2. I have heard I cannot consume oats on a gluten free diet, is this true?
    Historically, oats were not recommended to those following a gluten free diet because it was thought that avenin (the storage protein found in oats) was also toxic to gluten-intolerant individuals. Research in Europe and the US has described that oats are a now well-tolerated celiac disease food. When consumed in moderation, oats do not contribute to abdominal symptoms, no prevent intestinal healing, in most children and adults.

    Regular, commercially available oats are frequently contaminated with wheat or barley. “Pure, uncontaminated” oats have become available from several companies in the US and Canada. These companies process oats in dedicated facilities and their oats are tested for purity. Pure, uncontaminated oats can be consumed safely in quantities < 1 cup per day. It is important that you talk to your physician and your registered dietitian prior to starting oats because it can affect how you eat gluten free foods.
     
     
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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on choosing celiac disease foods that are safe for those learning how to eat gluten free. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  3. Where can I learn more about celiac disease and celiac disease foods?
    There are many organizations that offer information, conduct research, or provide support for those with celiac disease and those that want to know how to eat gluten free.

    If you would like to learn more about celiac disease, celiac disease foods, or gluten intolerance, please visit these sites:

    Celiac Disease Foundation
    Celiac Sprue Association
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program
    Children's Digestive Health & Nutrition Foundation
    Gluten Free Living Magazine
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    Kids with Food Allergies
    Living Without Magazine
    National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
    GlutenFreeCheckList.com
    Innate Health Group Center for Food Allergies


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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on how to eat gluten free with celiac disease foods. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  4. What is gluten?
    The word gluten is a general name to describe the storage proteins, or prolamins, found in wheat (gliadin), rye (hordein), barley (secalin), and derivatives of these grains. Gliadins are the proteins mainly involved in celiac disease.

    It is important when referring to foods that are gluten free to point out that they are free of wheat, rye, and barley. Though many food manufacturers are now specializing in gluten free options, it is important to reiterate the definition so that consumers can learn how to eat gluten free. Despite the fact that celiac disease is so common, many people are still unaware of the disease and the diet implications.
     
     
    ________________________________________

    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on the gluten-free diet and foods available for those with celiac disease. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  5. Is there a health benefit to following a gluten free diet for those who do not have celiac disease?

    As of 2009, there are no other medical conditions for which evidence-based guidelines suggest a gluten free diet is indicated. Though there are some conditions that are using the gluten free diet for relief of symptoms, there is no consensus within the medical community that the gluten free diet or celiac disease foods will treat any other medical condition. For those that do not show signs of food allergies, it is not necessary to learn how to eat gluten free or follow any of the associated diet guidelines.

    Following the gluten free diet, as well as any other restrictive diet that excludes a particular food group, can put people at risk for vitamin and mineral deficiencies, if not followed properly, or followed without guidance from a physician or registered dietitian. Whole wheat products are rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals and, unless otherwise indicated, are recommended as part of a healthy diet.
     
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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on the gluten-free diet. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  6. I have just been diagnosed with celiac disease…now what?
    Once an individual has been confirmed to have celiac disease through a biopsy, it is important to talk to a physician about how to eat gluten free. The first step to a successful transition to becoming gluten-free is to find a registered dietitian specializing in celiac disease that can guide selection of celiac disease foods and lifestyle changes. Check out the following webpage to find a dietitian specializing in celiac disease in your area: http://glutenfreedietitian.com/newsletter

    A registered dietitian will teach someone newly diagnosed with celiac disease how to follow a gluten free diet and learn the difference between celiac disease foods to avoid vs. foods appropriate to consume. He/she will also teach someone with celiac disease how to prevent nutrient deficiencies and design a balanced diet meeting the needs for all important vitamins and minerals.

    The only treatment for celiac disease is to follow a gluten free diet and avoid all foods that contain wheat, rye and barley. Following the gluten free diet starts the healing process of existing intestinal damage, but also prevents future complications of the disease including osteoporosis, anemia, and even certain types of cancers of the intestinal tract. Research has found the small intestine is usually completely healed in 6-18 months. Thus, the damaged villi are restored and able to absorb nutrients as in individuals without celiac disease. Learning how to eat gluten free can lead to immense healing.

    It is essential for the gluten free diet to be strictly followed for life. No matter how small the amount, the consumption of gluten will damage the small intestine. Regardless of prior symptoms, or age upon initial diagnosis, all persons with celiac disease are the same. Lifelong avoidance of wheat, rye, barley and derivatives of these grains - and choosing safe celiac disease foods - will keep celiac individuals as healthy as individuals without celiac disease.
     
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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on how to eat gluten free. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  7. What other grains am I allowed to consume on a gluten free diet?
    There are a large variety of grains that are safe for people with celiac disease, and that can be considered safe, celiac disease foods. Many people are led to believe that the only gluten free grains available are white rice, potatoes, and corn; however, there are many more grains from which to choose!

    Amaranth, brown rice, buckwheat, flaxseed, Montina™, and quinoa are some of the more healthful grains to choose when considering how to eat gluten free. These grains are higher in protein and amino acids, some higher in iron than wheat, and all can be a great source of fiber.
     
     
    ____________________________________

    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on the gluten-free diet. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  8. Are there special health professionals who work with celiac disease and can help determine how to eat a gluten free diet?
    Celiac disease affects more than 3 million Americans; however, many have not been diagnosed. Over the recent years, efforts have been made to increase the awareness of celiac disease, because previously it was thought to be a rare condition.

    Many physicians and researchers across the country specialize in celiac disease and are leading investigations to learn more about the disease as well as which foods are safe for celiac disease. Research centers such as the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University have talented physicians, dietitians, and research staff investigating more about the disease in efforts to find alternative treatment options and prevention for celiac disease, and further understanding of how to eat gluten free for life.
     
     
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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on the gluten-free diet and celiac disease foods that can be incorporated. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.
  9. What about cross-contamination, how careful do I have to be?

    When it comes to how to eat gluten free, complete gluten avoidance is extremely difficult, if not impossible. All people with celiac disease are exposed to products containing trace amounts of gluten, even when the products are sold as naturally gluten free or celiac disease foods. Research has investigated a safe threshold for gluten exposure and has indicated a calculated daily intake of 30 mg of gliadin does not harm the intestinal mucosa of a person with celiac disease. Therefore at present, a safe limit could be set between 10 and 100 mg gliadin.

    In order to estimate the safe and rational threshold for daily gluten intake, the amount of residual gluten in gluten free products and the total intake of these products must be considered. It is important for people with celiac disease to use their best judgment when assessing which products to consume, and always adjusting their awareness of how to eat gluten free.

    It is a good practice to frequently call food product manufacturers to learn more about the production of their food to ensure the safety of celiac disease food choices.
     

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    Lara Field, MS, RD, LDN has over seven years experience in clinical practice at two of the top ranked pediatric hospitals in the country, Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago and University of Chicago Medical Center. She has specialized in pediatric nutritional care including the pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology clinics. As an advisory board and executive committee member of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Lara always has been active in the celiac disease community. She frequently educates patients, family members, and nutrition professionals on the gluten-free diet. Lara serves as a member of the American Dietetic Association and is a member of Dietetic Practice Groups including Nutrition Entrepreneurs, Pediatrics, and Medical Nutritional Therapy. Lara is very active locally with the Chicago Dietetic Association and recently was elected as the nominating committee chair.

    *Please keep in mind that the information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Before embarking on any weight loss plan or making dietary changes, you should consult your doctor.

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At Attune Foods, we believe what matters most is what's inside. We make our foods from simple ingredients, simply made like Uncle Sam cereal, Erewhon organic cereals and grahams or our attune probiotic chocolate bars. Attune Foods commits to bringing you food that helps you feel good and that you can feel good about eating with your family.